Adoptions

Persons seeking to adopt a child may file an application with the court seeking to have the court declare the child to be the child of the applicant(s).

A single person or husband and wife jointly may adopt a minor child who was born to different biological parents. In rare instances, an adult may be adopted.

There are several types of adoptions heard by the court:

The person seeking to adopt is the step-parent of the child to be adopted.

Parties may use the services of a licensed adoption agency. The birth parents either voluntarily surrender custody of the child to the agency, or the Juvenile Court may have terminated the parental rights of the birth parents.

A private adoption is effected when an attorney or a private adoption agency acts as an intermediary between the adopting parents and the birth parents.

A child born in a foreign country and adopted by an Ohio family is referred to as a foreign adoption. Often the first adoption is established under the laws of the foreign country in which the child was born, with a second adoption proceeding in Ohio, after which an Ohio birth certificate is issued.

An adult adoption is used when an individual over 18 years wishes to be adopted and meets the criteria under Ohio law.

Court Assessor

The "court assessor" is an old fashioned term for investigator. In step-parent, agency, and private adoptions, the services of the adoption assessor are used to investigate the adopting family and prepare a report to be given to the court called a home study. This information helps the court determine whether the adopting family is suitable and in the best interest of the adoptee child.

Consent to Adoption

Generally, the legal parent or parents of the minor to be adopted must consent. If the child is over twelve years of age, the child must also consent.

Birth Certificate

The original birth certificate will be sealed and a new birth certificate is issued. The adopting parent or parents will be named on the new birth certificate just as though they had been the birth parents.

The information contained on this web site is not legal advice, nor should it substitute for the assistance of a qualified attorney. Good legal assistance can speed up the court process and prevent costly legal errors.

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